Japanese pop group chants cryptocurrency choruses


TOKYO (Reuters) – A Japanese pop group hopped on the bitcoin bandwagon on Friday, dedicating themselves to singing and dancing about the cryptocurrencies that have taken the globe by storm, and specifically their homeland.

Associates of Japan’s idol group “Digital Currency Girls” carrying cryptocurrency-themed masks pose immediately after performing in their debut phase occasion in Tokyo, Japan, January 12, 2018. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

In their debut, the 8 “Virtual Currency Girls”, or Kasotsuka Shojo in Japanese, cavorted in maid costumes with frilly skirts and whole-confront experienced wrestling-style masks with fuzzy pom-pom ears, extolling the virtues of decentralized electronic currencies these kinds of as bitcoin.

“They’re so hassle-free you variety of have to marvel why we did not have them right before,” reported Rara Naruse, 18, the group’s chief. “We want everyone to study a lot more about them.”

Every group member adopted the guise of a unique cryptocurrency, providing a transient self-introduction to 20 lovers collected at the venue in downtown Tokyo.

Then they released into “The Moon, Cryptocurrencies and Me”, a stirring anthem incorporating lines these kinds of as “Be watchful about your password! Really do not use the identical a person!” to warn versus the potential risks of buying and selling cryptocurrency, and also a lot more obscure kinds, in English, these kinds of as “Hot working day, forget myself, go to the moon.”

Associates of Japan’s idol group “Digital Currency Girls” carrying cryptocurrency-themed masks accomplish in their debut phase occasion in Tokyo, Japan, January 12, 2018. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

Naruse emphasised on the group’s site that it is not out to encourage investment, but fairly to educate persons about cryptocurrencies in an entertaining way.

The maid costumes aimed to raise the group’s recognition with the use of a globally recognizable “uniform,” she additional. Obviously, all products sold at the venue is paid out for in bitcoin, as are live performance tickets and the members’ salaries.

“I know absolutely practically nothing about bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, but I want to make confident I have some on hand for more live shows and to acquire products,” reported enthusiast Kensaku Nagao, 46.

Japan and South Korea are residence to some of the greater electronic exchanges, with investors piling in as progress in bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies soared last year, provoking regulators’ problems.

On Thursday, South Korea reported it planned to ban cryptocurrency buying and selling, sending bitcoin rates plummeting and throwing the digital coin marketplace into turmoil.

Creating by Elaine Lies Editing by Clarence Fernandez



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